Latest guidance from GPs about using pulse oximetry to help if you catch COVID-19

1. It is important to know what your baseline oxygen levels are (because not everyone has a perfect oxygen saturation, especially if you have a respiratory disease).

2. If you normally have SpO2 of 95-99% and your oxygen drops to between 92-95%, and you know you have the virus, you need to contact your GP urgently.

3. If your SpO2 falls between 88-92% you should go to A&E immediately. If your SpO2 is usually lower than 95% and you have the virus, ANY drop in Sp02 is a cause for concern and you should seek help immediately.

The longer you leave asking for help, the worse the risk will be of serious illness.

This information comes from NHS Oximetry@home.

It is clear that generating a “baseline” of information before you catch COVID-19 is important. So, the routine (daily if you can) monitoring and recording your oxygen saturation so that you can show you doctor or nurse, is important evidence to see if you are at risk should your oxygen levels suddenly drop.

For patients with cardiac or respiratory conditions, it is advised that you use your pulse oximeter daily.

Get our Pulse Oximeter3 from here.

The changing face of cardiac rehab: How health technology has improved the way cardiac patients access vital rehabilitation services

16th November 2020, St Ives Cambridgeshire: Aseptika, a Cambridge-based healthcare business, has developed an innovative remote monitoring system for cardiac rehabilitation patients. This system has been awarded a “Highly Commended” in the Selfcare Forum awards for 2020.

Self-Care Week Highly Commended for Aseptika's Active+me REMOTE Cardiac Recovery service.
Self-Care Week -Highly Commended for Aseptika’s Active+me REMOTE Cardiac Recovery service.

The system, called Active+me REMOTE Cardiac Recover, is a cardiac recovery service delivered remotely in partnership with cardiac rehabilitation centres. During the Covid-19 enforced lockdown earlier this year, a pilot of the Active+me REMOTE service at Addenbrooke’s Hospital in Cambridge quickly adapted to help patients keep up their exercise and manage their recovery thanks to funding from Innovate UK and support from Eastern AHSN.

This generated valuable data for the service, but it was not until Aseptika was accepted onto the Wellbeing Accelerator programme at Sheffield Hallam University’s Advanced Wellbeing Research Centre (AWRC) that the true value of this data could be realised.

The AWRC Wellbeing Accelerator, with support from the Yorkshire and Humber AHSN (YH AHSN), has funded an independent analysis of the data that was conducted by an AWRC senior research fellow, Dr Simon Nichols.

Every year the Self Care Forum awards prizes and commendations for exemplary self-care innovation during Self-Care Week. Self-Care Week, which this year is between 16-22 November, is an annual national awareness week that focuses on embedding support for self-care across communities, families and generations. This year, the Self Care Forum awards will also celebrate good self-care practice for coronavirus initiatives.

Active+me empowers patients to take charge of their own recovery, providing them with standard cardiac rehabilitation care which includes guidance on safe exercise and education on risk factors and lifestyle changes, reinforced by educational resources on the Active+me REMOTE Recovery platform. In addition, patients are provided with medical monitors to take home and record progress such as activity levels, blood pressure, weight and oxygen saturation. The data from which are uploaded to an app and shared securely with the hospital’s cardiac rehabilitation team.

Despite the challenge of implementing a pilot during the pandemic, the commitment and focus of all partners to adapt and deliver the programme has led to the successful rollout of the Active+me REMOTE Cardiac Recovery service.

Dr Nichols said, “our evaluation of the Addenbrooke’s data found participating in cardiac rehabilitation, facilitated using the Active+me REMOTE system, was associated with an increase in Patient Activation Measure scores. The Patient Activation Measure is a tool used to assess patient knowledge of, and confidence in, managing their health condition.

“There were also reductions in systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, and an increase in self-reported physical activity levels. These findings are significant in supporting Commissioner decision making regarding how cardiac rehab services are provided throughout the upcoming lockdown and beyond”.

Kevin Auton, founder of Aseptika, said “this highly commended award is a ringing endorsement of the benefits of our Active+me REMOTE Recovery service for patients and the benefits of a great team of collaborators. Without the great work and support of the teams at the AWRC, Addenbrookes, YH AHSN and Eastern AHSN none of this would have been possible”.

The Active+me REMOTE Cardiac Recovery programme incorporates the use by patients of Blood Pressure Monitor, Pulse Oximeter, Activity Tracker and Body Analyser, linked by Bluetooth to their smart device. One patient using the Active+me REMOTE platform is Cambridgeshire-based Steve King. Steve enrolled onto the pilot in January 2020 after having a triple heart bypass in September 2019. He reflected:

“I had a heart attack in December 2014, which should have been a big wake up call for me, but my heart attack was minor and looking back on it now I didn’t recognise I was particularly ill. So, I completed my cardiac rehabilitation and went back to work, without keeping up the exercise programme or making the changes I probably should have made to my diet and lifestyle. Subsequently I found myself needing a triple heart bypass five years later”.

“After my surgery I started my cardiac rehabilitation, but what was different this time was I enrolled onto the Active+me pilot which piqued my interest because of my research background. I also found out that I was borderline type 2 diabetic, which was further motivation to make a change to my lifestyle. Now I measure my weight, blood pressure and blood oxygen levels – all of which I didn’t pay any attention to before – as part of my daily routine. But what interests me most is the trends in my data over time, which I can monitor through the app.”

Steve found the changes brought about in response to the coronavirus pandemic were in fact more beneficial to his rehabilitation:

“After the experience with my blood pressure rising, I decided I would commit to the group fitness classes in the next phase of my rehabilitation, but there was a waiting list for spaces. However, when COVID-19 caused all the fitness classes to be moved onto Zoom the classes could accommodate more people, so I was able to join straightaway. That was a real benefit as I wanted to join the sessions while I was still motivated”.

“One of the things I’ve learnt through my cardiac rehabilitation this time is I’m not great at motivating myself. So, the online fitness classes have been great at holding me accountable and have given me the structure I needed”.

Steve concludes:

“I am really grateful I took part in the pilot; I feel much more self-aware, confident and in control of what I do now”.

Cardiac Rehabilitation Facts

Regular exercise is one of the best ways for people to make a good recovery following cardiac surgery or a heart attack, however in England only 50% of patients eligible for cardiac rehabilitation take up the service (1), which typically involves a mix of face-to-face exercise and education group classes.

Women are much less likely than men to take up cardiac rehabilitation, particularly within mixed white and Asian ethnic groups. (2)

The British Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation highlights the importance of long-term management plans with strategies to encourage self-management and responsibility to pursue a healthy lifestyle, including regular exercise, a key priority. (3)

References

  1. British Heart Foundation., (2019). The National Audit of Cardiac Rehabilitation: quality and outcomes report 2019 [online]. British Heart Foundation. [Viewed 20th July 2020]. Available here.
  2. British Heart Foundation., (2018). The National Audit of Cardiac Rehabilitation: quality and outcomes report 2018 [online]. British Heart Foundation. [Viewed 20th July 2020]. Available here.
  3. British Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation., (2017). The BACPR Standards and Core Components for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and Rehabilitation [online]. [Viewed 31st July 2020]. Available here.

For a full list of the winning and highly commended entries of the Self Care Coronavirus Innovation Awards visit http://www.selfcareforum.org/2020/11/06/self-care-coronavirus-innovation-award/

Taking Cardiac Rehab Online during Lockdown

How Addenbrooke’s Hospital continued to deliver rehabilitation for cardiac patients using Active+me during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Patients enrolled on the Active+me cardiac rehabilitation pilot were able to complete the programme without face-to-face contact.

When the coronavirus pandemic forced hospitals to deliver services differently, a cardiac rehabilitation pilot being run at Addenbrooke’s Hospital quickly adapted to help patients keep up their exercise and manage their recovery thanks to funding from Innovate UK and support from Eastern AHSN.

Active+me is a solution developed by Aseptika which empowers patients to take charge of their own recovery, providing them with standard cardiac rehabilitation care which includes guidance on safe exercise and education on risk factors and lifestyle changes, reinforced by educational resources on the Active+me platform. In addition, patients are provided with medical monitors to take home and record progress such as activity levels, blood pressure, weight and oxygen saturation. The data from which are uploaded to an app and shared securely with the hospital’s cardiac rehabilitation team.

A pilot of the platform at the hospital, part of Cambridgeshire University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, started in September 2019 with support from Eastern AHSN. However, the COVID-19 pandemic caused all face-to-face cardiac rehabilitation appointments to be paused, meaning patients could no longer attend exercise classes as part of the programme.

To ensure the same high-quality level of care could be delivered to Cambridgeshire patients from beginning to end without any face-to-face contact, the hospital worked with Aseptika (providers of the Active+me platform) and Eastern AHSN, with support from an Innovate UK grant, to rapidly adapt the Active+me programme through online classes. The Active+me programme was initially built on face-to-face appointments and classes

The monitors and equipment combined with the Active+me platform meant that while classes were delivered over video call, patients had added reassurance of the cardiac rehabilitation team remotely monitoring progress, identifying any concerns and supporting early intervention where necessary.

Despite the challenge of implementing a pilot during the pandemic, the commitment and focus of all partners to adapt and deliver the pilot has led to the rollout of a new service called Active+me REMOTE Cardiac Recovery, delivered remotely in partnership with cardiac rehabilitation centres. The programme was also accepted onto the Advanced Wellbeing Research Centre’s Wellbeing Accelerator at Sheffield Hallam University, through which the project gained access to the Sport and Physical Activity Research Group who are undertaking an independent evaluation.

One patient using the Active+me platform is Cambridgeshire-based Steve King. Steve enrolled onto the pilot in January 2020 after having a triple heart bypass in September 2019. He reflected:

“I had a heart attack in December 2014, which should have been a big wake up call for me but my heart attack was minor and looking back on it now I didn’t recognise I was particularly ill. So, I completed my cardiac rehabilitation and went back to work, without keeping up the exercise programme or making the changes I probably should have made to my diet and lifestyle. Subsequently I found myself needing a triple heart bypass five years later.”

“After my surgery I started my cardiac rehabilitation, but what was different this time was I enrolled onto the Active+me pilot which piqued my interest because of my research background. I also found out that I was borderline type 2 diabetic, which was further motivation to make a change to my lifestyle. Now I measure my weight, blood pressure and blood oxygen levels – all of which I didn’t pay any attention to before – as part of my daily routine. But what interests me most is the trends in my data over time, which I can monitor through the app.”

Steve found the changes brought about in response to the coronavirus pandemic were actually beneficial to his rehabilitation:

“After the experience with my blood pressure rising I decided I would commit to the group fitness classes in the next phase of my rehabilitation, but there was a waiting list for spaces. However, when COVID-19 caused all the fitness classes to be moved onto Zoom the classes could accommodate more people, so I was able to join straightaway. That was a real benefit as I wanted to join the sessions while I was still motivated.”

“One of the things I’ve learnt through my cardiac rehabilitation this time is I’m not great at motivating myself. So the online fitness classes have been great at holding me accountable and have given me the structure I needed.”

Steve concludes:

“I am really grateful I took part in the pilot, I feel much more self-aware, confident and in control of what I do now.”

–Ends– 

Cardiac Rehabilitation Facts

Regular exercise is one of the best ways for people to make a good recovery following cardiac surgery or a heart attack, however in England only 50% of patients eligible for cardiac rehabilitation take up the service,1 which typically involves a mix of face-to-face exercise and education group classes.

Women are much less likely than men to take up cardiac rehabilitation, particularly within mixed white and Asian ethnic groups.2

The British Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation highlights the importance of long-term management plans with strategies to encourage self-management and responsibility to pursue a healthy lifestyle, including regular exercise, a key priority.3

References

  1. British Heart Foundation., (2019). The National Audit of Cardiac Rehabilitation: quality and outcomes report 2019 [online]. British Heart Foundation. [Viewed 20th July 2020]. Available here.
  2. British Heart Foundation., (2018). The National Audit of Cardiac Rehabilitation: quality and outcomes report 2018 [online]. British Heart Foundation. [Viewed 20th July 2020]. Available here.
  3. British Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation., (2017). The BACPR Standards and Core Components for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and Rehabilitation [online]. [Viewed 31st July 2020]. Available here.
Active+me REMOTE programme incorporating the six-pillars of self-care.
Active+me REMOTE programme incorporating the six-pillars of self-care.

Asthma Smart App (Asthma+me) used in primary care avoids presentation to Emergency Department for 6 year old with severe asthma

Moira Gibbons1, Robert Thornton2, Nicki Barker1, Craig Burgess3, Kevin Auton3, Heather Elphick1.

1Department of Respiratory Medicine, Sheffield Children’s NHS Foundation Trust, 2Wath Health Centre, Rotherham and 3Aseptika Ltd, Cambridgeshire

Introduction

Paediatric asthma is an NHS 10-year (NHS Long-Term) priority1 and innovative approaches to managing the increasing number of children with moderate-to-severe asthma are needed. In 2014, a national review found that nine out of ten childhood asthma deaths in the UK could have been prevented2. Smart inhalers and Health Apps in a digitally evolving NHS have the potential to support self-management of long-term conditions such as asthma at scale3. This approach would support digital transformation of health services to risk stratify according to need and to provide a personalised approach to care4, showing both clinical and economic benefit by reducing emergency admissions and improving patient safety and quality of life5.

One proposed solution is Asthma+me, a comprehensive CE-marked technology-enabled self-care solution for children and young people with asthma. Core to Asthma+me is education, engagement and empowerment for children /young people and their parents. It supports integrated Bluetooth-connected devices for monitoring lung function and medication adherence as well as medication and symptom diaries. A weekly PDF report generated by the app is sent automatically from Asthma+me to the electronic patient record. The clinician can review progress remotely or can access the patient-generated data in the event of an emergency consultation.

We report the case of a 6 year old boy with severe asthma in whom the use of data generated by Asthma+me gave his GP confidence to monitor the child rather than sending him to the Emergency department at the local hospital.

Case report

The patient is a boy aged 6yrs with a complex medical history including atopy, gastro-oesphageal reflux disease and severe asthma. His asthma is managed by his GP, his consultant paediatrician and the Difficult Asthma service at the tertiary paediatric respiratory centre.  Since September 2015, there have been 21 admissions to the local hospital because of asthma or wheeze.  Typically, the family have presented in the Emergency Department and, on two of these occasions, high dependency care has been required. Consequently, this child has become highly anxious about further hospitalisations.

The parent was trained in the use of the Asthma+me App as part of a randomised controlled trial being undertaken by the tertiary centre. The commercial partner, (Aseptika Ltd), was responsible for delivering this training in accordance with a protocol agreed with the clinical team. During this training, the parent reported that the child was experiencing an exacerbation and had been seen by their GP earlier that day. Oral steroids had been prescribed and a review booked for the following week.

The child continued to experience worsening symptoms over the intervening period and the parent administered the reliever inhaler as per the emergency instructions in the care plan.  The child was still unwell when reviewed by the GP six days later. The child’s parent took the opportunity to show their GP the Asthma+me report. The GP used the data from the report (Figure 1) and confirmed an improvement in the PEF/FEV1 from that morning. No wheeze was present at that time and therefore no further reliever medication was administered. A course of Amoxicillin was prescribed because of a persistent low-grade temperature. The child had an appointment already booked with his respiratory specialist in less than a fortnight.

Based on previous experiences of exacerbations, the parent had expected her child to be admitted to hospital that day via the Emergency Department. The GP agreed that this would have been the usual course of action had the extra clinical data provided by the Asthma+me App not been available. Instead, assessing the child in the context of the App data gave the GP the confidence to monitor the child’s progress. The GP stated “If I had just looked at the child, I would have sent him to A&E”.  

Following this event, the child continued to be adherent to their preventer inhaler and the use of the reliever inhaler decreased over the following weeks. The parent continued to record PEF & FEV1 four times a day during the exacerbation but was sufficiently confident to wait for their scheduled outpatient appointment with the respiratory consultant rather than attend the Emergency Department or make an urgent outpatient appointment at SCH. As the parent’s confidence in the control of the child’s asthma increased, the rate of recording PEF & FEV1 decreased to only twice daily and the use of reliever decreased steadily.

Child’s Vital Signs remote monitoring via Asthma+me for his severe asthma

Discussion

This is the first instance that we are aware of in which data generated by Asthma+me was used by an expert parent with a primary care-based clinician to support the avoidance of a visit to the Emergency Department.

The aim of the Asthma+me trial is to provide evidence of clinical and economical efficacy. One model for implementation would be a “Hub and spoke” model, in which the tertiary paediatric respiratory centre acts as the “hub” and the GP centre the “spoke”. This practice, at which there is considerable experience in respiratory medicine, could make an excellent “test centre” to drive forward expertise and confidence in the model in primary care, thereby reducing the need for escalation of care to emergency services.   

The parent of the boy described in the case report has given full consent for publication.

Acknowledgments

Support provided by SBRI Healthcare, Innovate UK, Yorkshire & Humber AHSN and NIHR (National Institute for Health Research) Children and Young People MedTech Cooperative. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or of the Department of Health and Social Care.

References

  1. https://www.longtermplan.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/nhs-long-term-plan-version-1.2.pdf
  2. Royal College of Physicians. (2014) Why Asthma Still Kills: the National Review of Asthma Deaths (NRAD) Confidential Enquiry Report. London: RCP.
  3. Marcano Belisario JS, Huckvale K, Greenfield G, Car J, Gunn LH. Smartphone and tablet self management apps for asthma. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 11. Art. No.: CD010013. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010013.pub2.
  4. Asthma UK (2017) “Smart Asthma” – real-world implementation of connected devices in the UK to reduce asthma attacks.
  5. Morton RW, Elphick HE, Rigby AS, Daw WJ, King DA, Smith LJ, et al. (2016) STAAR: a randomised controlled trial of electronic adherence monitoring with reminder alarms and feedback to improve clinical outcomes for children with asthma. Thorax. Published Online First: 04 November 2016. doi: 10.1136/thoraxjnl-2015-208171.

Coronavirus: Helping GPs with vital signs monitoring at home supporting online and telephone consultations

GPs are now seeing just seven in every 100 patients face-to-face because of the coronavirus outbreak, following a marked shift to online and telephone appointments across England.

Last year fewer than 1% of appointments were conducted by video link, and 80% were in person.  Social distancing and the need to protect NHS staff has changed this dramatically within three weeks. Now 100% of patients are first triaged and only 7- 8% have face-to-face appointments. Most consultations take place by telephone rather than video link, BBC analysis shows.

It is helpful if a patient can succinctly report their physiological signs measured at home to the GP during these virtual appointments and can describe how these may have changed.

Keeping a diary of physiological signs, symptoms and medication taken using the Activ8rlives4 Health+Wellness App helps patients report succinctly to their GP to get the assistance needed with their long-term health conditions such as COPD, asthma and heart disease.

Aseptika, an SME British company, has ramped-up its supply of self-monitoring devices to consumers, Local Authorities and the NHS since the start of the pandemic. Successful experience in training and supporting older patients with underlying cardiovascular or lung diseases as part of the Active+me programme (which can now be delivered remotely) demonstrates how patients gain health literacy and understand their health conditions – vital skills during what could be a prolonged period of shielding.

Where a patient at home requires assistance with their more recent medical history, a family member can support them using remote monitoring through Activ8rlives to review vital signs and can advocate on their behalf. The NHS is reporting reduced rates of attendance at A&E for heart attacks and non-Coronavirus related respiratory exacerbations and fear that patients are delaying the treatment they need. Remote support can provide encouragement for family members to seek early help from NHS services when there are declines in vital signs.

Asthma Smart App (Asthma⁺me) used in primary care avoids presentation to Emergency Department for 6-year old with severe asthma

Paediatric asthma is an NHS Long-Term Plan priority1 and innovative approaches to managing the increasing number of children with moderate-to-severe asthma are needed. Asthma+me is a comprehensive CE-marked technology-enabled self-care solution for children (6-12yrs) with moderate/severe/difficult asthma.

A new case study reports the instance of a 6-year old boy with severe asthma in whom the use of data generated by Asthma+me gave his GP and parent confidence to monitor the child rather than sending him to the Emergency Department at the local hospital.

Smart inhalers and Health Apps in a digitally evolving NHS have the potential to support self-management of long-term conditions such as asthma at scale2. With Asthma+me supporting families to self-care with wireless medical monitors, Activ8rlives PUFFClickerTM smart tracker for pressurised metered-dose inhalers (pMDIs), medication diaries, trigger alerts for pollution/pollen/weather, symptoms tracking, interactive and printable Care and Action Plans, extensive integrated educational syllabus and weekly reports going directly into their hospital records. This evidence-based integrated solution has been co-designed with a leading NHS paediatrician, to significantly reduce utilisation of NHS services by families of these children.

To obtain a copy of the case study, please request a copy here.

References:

  1. https://www.longtermplan.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/nhs-long-term-plan-version-1.2.pdf
  2. Marcano Belisario JS, Huckvale K, Greenfield G, Car J, Gunn LH. Smartphone and tablet self-management apps for asthma. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 11. Art. No.: CD010013. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010013.pub2.

Acknowledgments:

Support provided by SBRI Healthcare, Innovate UK, Yorkshire & Humber AHSN and NIHR (National Institute for Health Research) Children and Young People MedTech Cooperative. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or of the Department of Health and Social Care.

For further details, please contact Jessica Auton on +44 (0)1480 352 821 or email jessica.auton@aseptika.com

Aseptika named as one of four Medtech Companies to Watch: Most exciting respiratory disease technology companies in Europe

A new report “Counting the Cost of Respiratory Disease”, by Health Enterprise East, has named Aseptika as one of four Medtech companies to watch (1).

The NHS Long Term Plan identified respiratory disease as a top clinical priority, with a need for innovation in paediatric asthma treatment (2).

The report highlighted that hospital admissions due to respiratory diseases have increased sharply over the last seven years at three times the rate of all other admissions (2). 12.7 million people in the UK are now living with respiratory disease, costing the NHS £11 billion per year. The economic cost to the NHS for asthma is approximated at £3 billion each year (3).

The report by the Medtech Navigator, written and delivered by Health Enterprise East and part-funded by the European Development Fund (ERDF), names Aseptika as one of four companies to watch. Aseptika’s Asthma+me self-care solution for children aged 6-12 years treated in outpatient clinics with moderate-to-severe or difficult asthma, was one of the innovations highlighted in the report.

Asthma+me supports families to self-care with wireless medical monitors, Activ8rlives PUFFClickerTM smart tracker for pressurised metered-dose inhalers (pMDIs), medication diaries, trigger alerts for pollution/pollen/weather, symptoms tracking, interactive and printable Care and Action Plans, an extensive integrated educational syllabus and weekly reports going directly into their hospital records. This evidence-based integrated solution has been co-designed with a leading NHS paediatrician, to significantly reduce utilisation of NHS services by families of these children.

The other SME companies included in the report were: Cambridge Respiratory Innovations Ltd, My mHealth and Owlstone Medical.

Asthma is particularly prevalent in children, with around 20% of all patients (1.1 million) under the age of 15-year in the UK (4), of which 110,000 have moderate-to-severe or difficult asthma with an estimated cost to the NHS of £500 million each year (5).

 End

References

  1. Counting the Cost of Respiratory Disease: A MedTech Navigator Report. February 6, 2020.
  2. NHS Long Term Plan https://www.longtermplan.nhs.uk/
  3. NHS England https://www.england.nhs.uk/ourwork/clinical-policy/respiratory-disease/
  4. Grand View Research https://www.grandviewresearch.com/industry-analysis/respiratory-disease-testing-market
  5. Health economic estimates from Aseptika’s randomised controlled trial in collaboration with Sheffield Children’s NHS Foundation Trust https://www.activ8rlives.com/news/asthmame-the-app-being-trialled-to-help-children-manage-severe-asthma/

Notes to the Editor:

How does Asthma+me work?

Asthma+me was co-designed with a Paediatrician at an NHS Trust (UK) supporting the transition from treatment in specialist paediatric clinics to community care, with an initial focus on meeting the needs of children aged 6-12 years with moderate-to-severe asthma. It supports wireless medical monitors, including the Activ8rlives PUFFClickerTM smart tracker for pressurised metered-dose inhalers (pMDIs), medication diaries, trigger alerts for pollution/pollen/weather, symptoms tracking, care plan, extensive educational syllabus and weekly reports going directly to their hospital records. Asthma+me was launched in October 2018 and CE marked as a Class 1 Medical Device.

The Asthma+me App is used with the Activ8rlives PUFFClickerTM smart tracker for pMDIs prescribed for use by children (Ivax, GlaxoSmithKline, Teva and Chiesi), counting doses, recording inhaler shaken properly and timer supporting improved inhaler technique.

Asthma+me provides asthma disease monitoring via connected peak flow and other medical monitors, patient educational, medication adherence, motivational support through self-care to reduce severity of asthma attacks, A&E attendances and hospital admissions.

Children are involved in setting their goals and are motivated by incentives from their parent/carer to promote behaviour change, increasing adherence to their Care and Action Plan, which is generated automatically on their Smartphone.

How does it benefit clinicians / patients?

The lack of medication adherence is a global problem, £300million worth of medications/year wasted in primary care and 50% patients not taking medication as prescribed. The cost associated with treating all types of asthma is significant and there are 10% of these children with asthma that are clinically-defined moderate-to-severe or difficult-to-treat asthma and should be treated in specialist paediatric clinics.

Further information:

Activ8rlives, Activ8rlives.com, Asthma+me and Active+me are trademarks of Aseptika Ltd.

For more information about the paediatric asthma solution Asthma+me, call Jessica Auton on +44 (0)1480 352 821 or email jessica.auton@aseptika.com. Watch a video about Asthma+me here.

Activ8rlives Included on Annual Global Digital Health 100 List Recognising Innovative Health Technology Companies

The Journal of mHealth today announced their annual Global Digital Health 100 recognising the most innovative health technology companies from around the world. This is Activ8rlives’ fifth time to have been included on the list.

Now in its sixth year, the annual Global Digital Health 100 is one of HealthTech industry’s foremost technology award programmes, celebrating innovation and entrepreneurship. It recognises and supports health technology companies that are demonstrating the greatest potential to change the way that healthcare is delivered.

Activ8rlives makes the Global Digital Health 100 List for 2020.

Dr Kevin Auton, Managing Director of medical device innovator Aseptika (Activ8rlives), commented

“We are delighted to have received this accolade again this year.

Our most recent digital health initiative, Asthma+me, increases the knowledge and confidence of families with children that have moderate-to-severe asthma to self-manage. Improving skills, building expertise and having tools to forewarn of an asthma attack, all leading to better health outcomes, fewer hospital admissions and outpatient clinics means more time for children to attend school.

Current development and integration of AI components during the RCT will significantly enhance the solution allowing disease status reporting to the specialist clinic, less clinician time and in-built expertise for patients and parents. The Asthma+me App is the first remote monitoring self-management solution in paediatric clinical trials, that allows risk stratification on need, a personalised-care approach, thereby reducing emergency admissions, improving patient safety and quality-of-life.”

You can view the full list of winners here: www.thejournalofmhealth.com/digital-health-100

Further information:

For further details, please contact Jessica Auton on +44 (0)1480 352 821 or email jessica.auton@aseptika.com

The Journal of mHealth www.thejournalofmhealth.com

The Journal of mHealth is the “Voice of the HealthTech Industry“. A trusted resource for anyone with an interest in innovative and emerging health technologies, technology-enabled healthcare, medical devices, and digital health services, the Journal has a European audience of over 20,000.

The Journal of mHealth is a leading international publication bringing the latest developments in innovative emerging health technologies to healthcare and industry professionals around the world. Featuring, the Latest Industry News, Articles, Research, Industry Whitepapers and Market Reports.

The Global Digital Health 100

The Journal of mHealth organise the acclaimed annual Global Digital Health 100 power-list recognising the most innovative companies working in the HealthTech industry. If you want to know which companies are succeeding, and why, along with the latest technology trends in health technology then visit www.thejournalofmhealth.com/digital-health-100

The diversity of this year’s list stands out immediately, with new entrants from all sides of the technology spectrum, targeting just about every corner of healthcare. The honouree companies offer technologies across a range of categories including; clinical solutions, wearable technologies, healthcare applications, medical devices, virtual reality and data analytics. These are all solutions and services that are transforming, or have the potential to transform, and disrupt the way in which healthcare is delivered.

The Global Digital Health 100 recognises and celebrates the companies and technology leaders within the industry that are raising the bar and shaping the future of healthcare delivery. We are proud to support the growth and success of this thriving technology industry which is being led by the honourees of these awards.

As a leading publication in Europe and North America The Journal of mHealth gains a unique perspective from our relationship with emerging health technology markets around the World. This enables us to bring one of the most comprehensive lists of technology providers who are representative of the latest technology trends from across the healthcare industry.

The Global Digital Health 100 represents months of analysis by the editorial and advisory team at The Journal of mHealth, who considered the offerings and innovations from companies across the HealthTech ecosystem.

The judging criteria analysed 10 different quantitative and qualitative evaluation metrics including: disruptive impact; proof of concept; technology innovation; social value; effectiveness; execution of strategy; and, industry integration. The selected 100 companies demonstrate true innovation and the opportunity to disrupt the delivery of healthcare at scale. The selection criteria ensure that companies are considered truly upon innovation, allowing start-up offerings to be compared alongside established and larger organisations.

Activ8rlives’ Asthma+me solution looking to expand to UAE and Saudi Arabia

Aseptika Ltd (Activ8rlives) are attending Arab Health and are looking to expand efforts in establishing collaborations with clinicians and hospitals specialising in childhood asthma, seeking investment and a manufacturing base in the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia.

Research from the Global Asthma Network, points to approximately 14% of the UAE population are impacted by asthma, equating to 1.3 million people, well above the global average because of the dusty conditions and seasonal changes. From the UAE and Saudi Arabia, we have had significant interest in the early results from the Randomised Controlled Trial of our Asthma+me solution for children aged 6-12 years with moderate-to-severe asthma. For further information, come and visit our Stand H2-G50 to discuss the Asthma+me solution and learn how it can be translated into your language with a local educational syllabus.

Asthma+me was co-designed with a Paediatrician at an NHS Trust (UK) supporting the transition from treatment in specialist paediatric clinics to community care, with an initial focus on meeting the needs of children aged 6-12 years with moderate-to-severe asthma. It supports wireless medical monitors, medication diaries, trigger alerts for pollution/pollen/weather, symptoms tracking, care plan, an extensive educational syllabus and weekly reports going directly to their hospital records.

Asthma+me App connects with the Activ8rlives PUFFClicker to assist with self-care of 6-12 year olds with moderate-to-severe asthma

The Asthma+me App is used with the Activ8rlives PUFFClickerTM smart tracker for pressurised metered-dose inhalers pMDIs, counting doses, recording inhaler shaken properly and timer supporting improved inhaler technique. Asthma+me provides basic disease monitoring via connected devices, patient and parent/carer education, medication adherence, motivational support through self-care to reduce severity of asthma attacks, reducing A&E and hospital admissions.

Children are involved in setting their goals and are motivated by incentives from parent/carer to promote behaviour change, increasing adherence to their Care Plan, which is generated automatically on their Smartphone.

The Asthma+me App and Activ8rlives PUFFClicker Smart Inhaler Tracker are both approved as Class 1 Medical Devices under MDD and the Asthma+me App will transition to MDR as a Class IIa medical devices through a UK Notified Body.

What is unique about it?

Current development and integration of AI components during the RCT will significantly enhance the solution allowing disease status reporting to the specialist clinic, less clinician time and in-built expertise for patients and parents. The Asthma+me App is the first remote monitoring self-management solution in paediatric clinical trials, that allows risk stratification on need, a personalised-care approach, thereby reducing emergency admissions, improving patient safety and quality-of-life.

How does it benefit clinicians and patients?

Lack of medication adherence is a global problem, with £300million worth of medications/year wasted in primary care, with 50% of patients are not taking their medication as prescribed. Asthma is the most common chronic medical condition among UK Children/Young People. The cost associated with treating all types of asthma is significant. In the UK 10% of children with asthma are clinically-defined as moderate-to-severe or difficult-to-treat asthma and should be treated in specialist paediatric hospital clinics. There are no current comparators to Asthma+me worldwide.

What healthcare system need does your product meet?

Reducing Outpatient Appointments at tertiary hospital clinics for moderate-to-severe asthmatic children 6-12 years, so that more first appointments can be provided to other children. It also assists with medication adherence, education, improved self-confidence in self-care of childhood asthma, reduction of admissions and improved use of NHS resources.

Health economics

Assuming the average cost per family of each child with moderate-to-severe asthma treated as Out-Patient is £5,000-6,000pa in the UK. The intervention would need to provide 13.3% reduction in costs to be cash-neutral in Year 1. This does not include the costs associated with lost work-school days, reduced CO2 emissions or benefit of reducing waiting times for first appointments at paediatric clinics. As part of the Asthma+me RCT a health economics study will be undertaken to look at the financial and health impacts of this innovative Asthma+me care pathway.

Activ8rlives Asthma+me solution generates huge amounts of data, making it challenging to review all the patient data. Internal development programmes have demonstrated the use of Deep Learning/Neural Networks (Artificial Intelligence) that can be used to accurately forewarn of decline in health by up to 7-days and providing patients and parents/carers with actionable insights with enough time to start emergency treatment with antibiotics or steroids for example.

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Further information:

Activ8rlives, Activ8rlives.com, Asthma+me and Active+me are trademarks of Aseptika Ltd.

For further details, please contact Jessica Auton on +44 (0)1480 352 821 or email jessica.auton@aseptika.com

For a case study of Asthma+me follow this link

Aseptika Ltd www.activ8rlives.com

Aseptika Ltd began developing Activ8rlives in 2010 and is currently developing its fourth generation of integrated systems, which can be used by consumers and their healthcare service providers using a wide range of platforms or devices to better enable effective and easy self-monitoring.

Incorporating sensors and monitors ranging from consumer accessories to in vitro diagnostics (IVDs). Our focus is: respiratory and cardiovascular disease, cancer, promoting physical activity and weight management. Aseptika Limited has been certified by BSI to ISO 13485:2016 under certificate number MD691414.

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Exercise linked to lower risk of 7 cancers

Cancers of the kidney, liver, breast and colon may all be fended off by increased physical activity.

Exercise is linked to a reduced risk of seven types of cancer and the more physical activity the better, according to a study in the Journal of Clinical Oncology (December 2019), that looked at whether meeting the recommended physical activity guidelines had an effect on cancer risk.

HCCN cancer patients being active in the gym
HCCN cancer patients being active in the gym

In general, healthy adults are encouraged to engage in 2.5 – 5 hours a week of moderate-intensity activity, such as brisk walking or gardening.

Alternatively, up to 2.5 hours of vigorous activity — jogging, running, swimming laps, jumping rope or hiking — are recommended.

These “guidelines have largely been based on their impact on chronic diseases like cardiovascular disease and diabetes,” Alpa Patel, senior scientific director of epidemiology research at the American Cancer Society, said in a statement.

“These data provide strong support that these recommended levels are important to cancer prevention, as well.”

The study, from researchers at the American Cancer Society, National Cancer Institute and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, pooled data from nine studies, involving more than 755,000 adults.

Participants reported their leisure-time physical activity and were followed for a decade on average, to see if they developed 15 different types of cancer.

Meeting or exceeding the recommended guidelines goals was linked to a reduced risk of seven of those cancers. Among both men and women, the risk of kidney cancer was reduced by up to 17%, liver cancer by up to 27% and myeloma by up to 19%.

Among men, increased exercise was linked to up to a 14% reduced risk for colon cancer. Among women, more physical activity was associated with up to a 10% lower risk for breast cancer and up to an 18% lower risk of both endometrial cancer non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

The study was observational and the findings do not prove cause and effect. Indeed, it is possible people who exercise more also engage in other healthy lifestyle behaviours that may influence cancer risk.

But evidence is growing that physical activity may directly affect tumour growth: A 2016 study from the National Cancer Institute found people who exercised the most also had lower odds of developing cancers of the bladder, oesophagus, lung, rectum and stomach.

Exercise also helps protect against other diseases, including heart disease and Type 2 diabetes and has been shown to improve mood and sleep.